ALL THE THINGS: My New Favorites of 2018

The year is just about over — which means my birthday is coming very soon, in case you forgot — so like the rest of the greats, I’m sharing my Best Of list for 2018.

Not all of this stuff is new, but it’s all stuff I discovered in this calendar year and think you should discover in the next one.

Music

Lights2.jpg

Lights performing “Giants,” 2018 Juno Awards. CBC

  • One of my perennial favorites, Barenaked Ladies, didn’t do a new album this year (their latest, Fake Nudes, was released November 2017), but they were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame this spring. That’s not what this list item is about, though. I went to Vancouver (a city that would make the list if I was including places) to see their induction at the Juno Awards, where I discovered Canadian artist Lights. She doesn’t have a new album this year either, but four studio albums and acoustic versions of several will keep new fans busy for a while.
  • The Milk Carton Kids, another musical favorite of mine for several years, toured with a band for the first time in support of their album, All The Things I Did and All The Things I Didn’t Do. Also their first album with a band, it’s a refreshing yet familiar sound for these all-around talented guys.
  • All right, so Barenaked Ladies may not have a new record this year, but Steven Page, inducted into the Canandian Music Hall of Fame alongside his former bandmates, did. Discipline: Heal Thyself, Part II, is a followup to 2016’s Heal Thyself Park I: Instinct, and an excellent listen for any fan, new or old. Page has been on tour across North America and the UK with no sign of slowing down in the new year.

Television

  • 46748464_1312154128924622_3298555274765071323_n.jpg

    Esther Povitsky and Benji Alflalo in “Alone Together.” Freeform

  • If you’re in your late twenties, single, and still trying to figure out what you’re doing, Freeform’s Alone Together was a surprise TV find. Unfortunately, this series, produced by The Lonely Island, was canceled, but not before two seasons and twenty episodes made it to my living room.
  • You can’t go wrong with Amy Poehler. For real. She has elevated some great new artists to at least one season of TV success as she takes steps to becoming the next Lorne Michaels, and I’m very excited to see what she brings us in 2019. Actually seeing her face on TV, though, is made better only by that face being next to Nick Offerman’s, and the relentless positivity of Making It was a welcome addition to the summer schedule.
  • New this year? No. New to me? Also no. Deserving of a mention on this and every list? No doubt no doubt no doubt. For fans (and cast and crew) of Brooklyn Nine Nine, 2018 included one very long 24 hours between Fox canceling the series and NBC reviving it for a sixth season.

Movies

maxresdefault.jpg

Gilda Radner on “Saturday Night Live,” 1976. Broadway Video

  • A more pretentious man may have called this section “Film,” but that same person wouldn’t have put Solo: A Star Wars Story on his list. Solo is just a fun movie, the way Star Wars was a long time ago… in 1977. It certainly had some setbacks during production, but it’s hard not to watch this movie with the same grin that Han has the first time he flies the Millennium Falcon.
  • If you want to temper your grin with some crying, Love, Gilda (making it’s TV debut on CNN January 1) is the film for you. This look at the life of one of Saturday Night Live‘s first breakout star, Gilda Radner, draws you in with her humor and then… well, you’ll see. Narrated in her own words, thanks to archive recordings and diary pages read by some famous faces inspired by her work, this is an intimate look at one of TV’s brightest, fastest-burning stars.
  • Somewhere in that happy medium is Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, an uplifting documentary on Fred Rogers, the man behind “Mister” and featuring the people who knew him best.
Advertisement

Being A Man, Part 2: Brooklyn, New York

brooklynninenine_092814_1200_article_story_large.jpg

Sgt. Terry Jeffords, NYPD. (Universal Television)

As another television police procedural show explains at the beginning of every episode, the police are tasked with investigating crimes to serve the people. The people of New York City— and Brooklyn, especially—are served by one Sergeant Terry Jeffords of the 99th precinct, created by the same minds that brought us Parks and Recreation.

Whether you know him as The Ebony Falcon or the much simpler “Scary Terry,” Jeffords is an easily-recognized figure in the precinct. At six feet, four inches tall and 240 pounds of muscle and suspenders, he could cast a shadow over any of his colleagues, if he weren’t holding one of them over his own head. A chest bump with this former Syracuse University linebacker will end with someone on the floor. When Terry slams an office door, he causes structural damage.

When the audience meets Terry Jeffords in the series’ pilot episode, he is on desk duty after firing a combined eighteen rounds into two unarmed suspects while investigating a case.

Fortunately, the suspects were a mannequin and a piñata. After the brith of his twin daughters, Cagney and Lacey, Jeffords struggled with a fear of them growing up without a father. In contrast with the stereotypical “large black man” on TV, Jeffords frequently, and often in third-person, shares his softer side. Terry Jeffords is a devoted father, gifted artist, and an unfaltering pillar of support to his friends. He is intimidated by his somehow-bigger brother-in-law, who refers to him as “Tiny Terry.” He overcame obesity and struggled with a food addiction. After being detained by a fellow officer for being black in his own middle-class neighborhood, he struggles to balance the immediate consequences and the world he wants his baby girls to grow up in.

brooklyn-nine-nine_56829053-1950x1350-1950x1350.jpeg

Terry Jeffords, artist. (Universal Television)

Many of Jeffords’ traits are lifted from the real life of Terry Crews, the NFL player-turned-actor for whom the role was created. As an actor, Crews has moved from action movies to drama to comedy, managing to design furniture, build computers, and illustrate magazine covers in between.

In fall 2017, as women worldwide came together to speak about their experiences as victims of harassment and sexual assault, Crews became an outspoken male voice within the #MeToo movement. Crews detailed his experience being groped several years earlier by a well-known Hollywood agent and his reaction to it. In November 2017, Crews filed a report with the real-life Los Angeles Police Department.

He was met with a mixed response. While many applauded his willingness to come forward, many did not. Russell Simmons, music producer and co-founder of Def Jam Recordings, encouraged Crews to “give [his abuser] a pass.” Twitter trolls decided that the victim of male-on-male sexual assault had to be gay (an attack also levied against actor Anthony Rapp, who recently accused Kevin Spacey of an assault in the 1980s). Others questioned Crews’ masculinity because he did not respond with violence.

“My wife told me, three years earlier, she said ‘Terry, never handle any situation like this with violence. You are a target. You can be baited and pulled if you react physically.’ . . . If I would have just retaliated, in defense, I would be in jail right now. And that’s one thing I knew, being a large, African-American man, I would be seen as a thug. But I’m not a thug. I’m an artist.” (Good Morning America)

There is a debate whether the #MeToo movement should limited to women, but Crews’ voice is needed in the fight against sexual abuse. 1 in 6 men experience sexual abuse in their lifetime, but 87% do not report the incident. In the weeks and months since Crews filed his report, more men have come forward with similar incidents in their own lives.

Terry, whether Crews or Jeffords, subverts the stereotype of what a man is. He has spoken openly about the challenges he has faced (writing “Manhood: How to Be a Better Man or Just Live with One” in the process), and remains committed to the fight against sexual abuse.

Next week we visit a land of make believe to see one of America’s favorite men.